financial

5 QuickBooks Online Add-On Apps You May Need to Add

Not finding quite everything you need in QuickBooks Online? Here are some handy add-on apps available.

QuickBooks Online may work for you just fine as is. After all, it was designed to meet the needs of the millions of small businesses that want to manage and track their income and expenses, create records and transactions, and run reports to gauge their financial health. QuickBooks Online was also designed to grow along with your business. But there’s no need for Intuit to add internal features to do so. In fact, that would make it too expensive and unwieldy for many companies.

Instead, Intuit has partnered with other small business websites to provides add-ons–applications that extend the usefulness of QuickBooks Online in one or more areas, like accounts receivable and payable, inventory, and expense-tracking. They integrate easily to share data and do the extra work you need. Here are some of them to consider.

Bill.com

Bill.com automates your accounts receivable and payable processes. It supports electronic billing and payment, as well as multiple approval levels.

You can certainly enter and pay bills using QuickBooks Online. And you can send invoices to customers and receive payments. But adding a connection to Bill.com gives you more advanced options for accounts receivable and payable. Simply send your bills to Bill.com by scanning, emailing, faxing, or taking a picture with your smartphone. The site’s automation tools turn them into digital records and route them through your specified approvers. Once approved, they’re paid electronically or by paper check. Invoices are just as easy to process; customers can pay by using PayPal, credit card, or ACH. Bill.com’s mobile app makes it possible to keep up with invoices and bills while you’re out of the office.

Expensify

Are your employees still paper-clipping receipts to handwritten expense reports? This method is unnecessarily time-consuming – and often inaccurate. Expensify solves both problems. Your staff can take photos of receipts with their smartphones. Expensify then converts the expense information into coded digital records and submits them for approval based on your company’s policies. Credit card purchases can be automatically imported, too. All data is synchronized with QuickBooks Online in real-time and coded to reflect your preference of QBO’s expense accounts, customers/jobs, etc. Once you’ve approved a report, you can have the money deposited in the employee’s bank account the next day.

TSheets Time Tracking

TSheets employee scheduling software automates tasks that QuickBooks Online doesn’t do: scheduling and remote time-tracking for your hourly employees. Your staff no longer has to fill in paper timesheets. Instead, they can use their smartphones to track their hours and GPS location points. And while Excel is certainly better for creating schedules than paper, TSheets takes over that task, too. After you’ve approved timesheets, that information is sent over to QuickBooks, ready for use in your payroll processing.

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Your employees can easily “punch” in and out using their smartphones. TSheets also uses GPS technology so that your staff members’ locations are always known to you.

SOS Inventory

QuickBooks Online performs some basic inventory management tasks. You can create records for items and use them in transactions, and keep track of the number of items in stock so you know when to reorder (or have a sale). SOS Inventory goes well beyond those capabilities. You can create sales orders, track cost history and serial numbers, and document work-in-progress (WIP). SOS Inventory supports multiple locations and the entire pick/pack/ship process.

Insightly CRM

You can create thorough customer records in QuickBooks Online and document some of your interaction. But it doesn’t facilitate true Customer Relationship Management (CRM) nor project management. Insightly CRM does both. It lets you build exceptionally thorough customer profiles so that you can view social streams, email history, and any events, opportunities, or events related to them. Its project management features include the ability to track by pipelines or milestones, define contact roles and custom fields, and generate advanced project reporting.

QuickBooks Online Integration Key

All of these apps can work in standalone settings, but their integration with QuickBooks Online and their mobile capabilities create powerful partnerships that help you serve both your customers and your employees in ways that QuickBooks Online alone can’t.

We’re not trying to sell you applications here. Our concern is that you’re getting as much out of QuickBooks itself as you can. We can steer you toward add-on solutions if that seems necessary, but we’re always happy to work with you on getting to know QuickBooks Online better and matching its capabilities to your company’s needs.

Not Using QuickBooks Online? What You’re Missing Out On

If you dread every minute of the time you spend on accounting, you should know how QuickBooks Online can change your outlook.

How long would it take you to determine:

  • What your total expenses for this quarter are?
  • Whether or not your business is profitable as of today?
  • How much you’ve sold every month this year?
  • Which invoices are overdue?

If you’re using QuickBooks Online, you can get answers to all those questions—and more—in the time it takes you to sign on to the website.
That’s not an exaggeration. The first thing QuickBooks Online displays is what’s called its Dashboard. This is the site’s home page, which contains an array of charts and account balances that provide a quick overview of your finances. Click on an element here—say, a checking account balance—and you’ll be able to drill down and see the details behind it (in this case, an online account register). Click on the Expense graph, and a transaction report opens.

Your First Hours with QBO

QuickBooks Online is not one-size-fits-all. Its setup tools help you customize it to meet your own company’s needs.

QuickBooks Online works like other online productivity applications you may have used. It uses toolbars and buttons for navigation, drop-down lists and blank fields for data entry, and clickable links to open new related screens to trigger actions. Which is to say, the site is easy to use once you understand its structure. We can walk you through the early steps that are required, which involves tasks like: Using the provided setup tools to customize the site. Connecting QuickBooks Online to your bank and credit card company websites so you can work with transactions. Creating records for your customers, vendors, and the products and services you sell (you’ll be able to add new ones as your business grows). Learning about QuickBooks Online’s pre-built reports. Familiarizing yourself with the site’s workflow. Making the transition from your current accounting system.

How You’ll Benefit

Once you’re comfortable using QuickBooks Online, you’ll discover what millions of small businesses have already learned, that the site helps you:
Get paid faster. You can sign up with a payment processor to accept credit cards and direct bank withdrawals, which can speed up your customers’ responses to invoices. You’ll also be able to accept payments when you’re out of the office on your mobile devices.

Minimize errors. Once you enter data, QuickBooks Online remembers it. No more duplicate data entry that can cause costly mistakes.

Find any detail in seconds. QuickBooks Online has powerful search tools that allow you to find what you’re looking for quickly.
Better service customers. Because your customer profiles include transaction histories, you’ll be able to deal with questions and problems quickly and accurately.

Bill time as well as invoice products. QuickBooks Online supports sales of time-based services with capable time-tracking tools.

Improve your customers’ and vendors’ perception of you. Your business associates will know that you’re using state-of-the-art technology by the forms you share and the customer service you provide.

Save money and time. As the accountant rotterdam has noted, it does take some time to make the transition to QuickBooks Online. But you’ll quickly make that up with the hours you’ll save on accounting tasks, and be able to concentrate on tasks that improve your bottom line.

Be prepared to grow. Because all of your financial data is organized and easily accessible, you’ll be able to quickly generate reports that help you plan for a more profitable future. Banks and investors will need some of these if you decide to seek financing.

Mobile Access

Although you may do the bulk of your accounting work on your desktop or laptop, you’ll have access to many of the site’s features on your smartphone. Your home page displays both an abbreviated version of your browser-based dashboard and a list of recent transactions. You can view, edit, and build new customer, vendor, and product or service records. Snap a photo of a receipt to document an expense and look up or create invoices, estimates, and sales receipts. Record payments, view critical reports, and add notes. Of course, your mobile data is always synchronized with the site itself.

QuickBooks Online lets you do much of your accounting work when you’re away from the office with its mobile app.

Happy to Help

QuickBooks Online was designed for small business people, not accountants. But it includes features that are best used in conjunction with our consulting services, like advanced reports, payroll, and the Chart of Accounts. In fact, the site makes it easy for us to have access to your data so we have the ability to monitor and troubleshoot.

We’ve helped countless sole proprietors and small businesses move their accounting operations to QuickBooks Online, and we’ve seen the difference it’s made in their productivity as well as their attitude toward financial management. Contact us, and we’ll be happy to do the same for you.

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Still doing your accounting manually? You’re spending unnecessary hours and experiencing needless frustration. Talk to us about QuickBooks Online.

Did you know you can do much of your accounting work and accept customer payments on your smartphone? Let us introduce you to QuickBooks Online.

Are you often away from the office? QuickBooks Online lets you handle accounting tasks from anywhere there’s an internet connection. We can tell you how.

Does your manual accounting system make it hard to keep track of customers and inventory? QuickBooks Online can organize and manage both. Contact us.

Getting Started with Accounts in QuickBooks Online, Part 1

QuickBooks Online was built to work with transactions downloaded from your online financial institutions. Here’s how to work with them.

The ability to import transactions from financial institutions into QuickBooks Online is definitely one of the best things about the site. You may have even signed up for that very reason.

By now, you’ve probably already set up at least one connection. But are you using all of the QuickBooks Online’s account tools? There’s a lot you can do once you’ve imported in data from your bank or credit card provider with the help of an accountant. Before you start managing your own money, look for Accountants to get help fast.

We’ll explore these features in this column and the next.

First Steps

If you’re a new subscriber, you may not have established these critical links yet. It’s an easy process. Start by clicking the Banking link in the left vertical navigation pane. In the upper right corner, click Add Account and enter the name of your financial institution if it’s not pictured. Then follow the instructions you’re given on the screen. These can vary depending on the bank or credit card provider, but you’re always at least asked to enter the user name and password that you use to log into each online.

Need help with this? Let us know.

Viewing Your Transactions

Once you’ve made a successful connection, you’ll be returned to the Bank and Credit Cards page. You should see a card-shaped graphic at the top of the screen for each account you’ve linked. Click on one. The table that opens is not your account register. The view here defaults to For Review, which refers to transactions you’ve downloaded. The All tab should also be highlighted; we’ll get to Recognized transactions later.

When you first download transactions into QuickBooks Online, before you’ve done anything with them, many will appear under For Review.

There’s a lot going on here, so don’t be surprised if you’re confused. Review each transaction by clicking on it. QuickBooks Online will have guessed at how it should be categorized, but you can change this by opening the list in the category field and selecting the correct one. It’s critical that you get this right since it will have an impact on reports and income taxes. If you need to split it between multiple categories, click on that button found to the right. If the transaction is Billable, check that box and choose a customer from the drop-down list. If you don’t see this box, click the gear icon in the upper right and select Account and Settings | Expenses. Check to see that Make Expenses and Items Billable is turned On (click on Off, then check the appropriate box to turn it on).

Next, determine how you want to process the transaction by clicking on one of the three buttons at the top of the transaction box. Do you want to accept it and add it to that account’s register? Do you want QuickBooks Online to Find (a) Match for it (like a payment that matches an invoice, for example)? Or, do you want to transfer it to another account? Once you’ve made one of these three selections, the transactions that you’ve added or matched will move under the In QuickBooks tab (where you can still Undo them) and will be available in the account’s register.

Other Options

You can save time by using QuickBooks Online’s Batch Actions tool or even with DPS Accounting .

Say you run across some duplicate or personal transactions that you don’t want to appear in the current account’s register. Check the box in front of each, then click the arrow in the Batch Actions box. Select Exclude Selected. They’ll then be available under the Excluded tab. You can also Accept or Modify multiple transactions simultaneously by using this tool.

So far, you’ve been viewing All your transactions. Click on Recognized to the right of it. These are transactions that are already familiar to QuickBooks Online because they’ve appeared before and/or have been matched, or because you’ve created Bank Rules for them (we’ll address that concept next month). You’ll need to address these the same way you did the transactions in the For Review section; you can either Add or Transfer them.

If you’re new to QuickBooks Online, this may all sound pretty complicated. It can be at first. But once you’ve worked with downloaded transactions for a while, you’ll understand the flow much better. If you’re not clear on the process from the start, it can lead to trouble. Contact us at your convenience. We’d be happy to sit down with you and go through it all using your own company’s data; the familiarity may help.

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If you’re new to QuickBooks Online, there’s a lot you need to understand about dealing with downloaded transactions out the gate. Let us help.

When you download transactions into QuickBooks Online, the site sometimes automatically “matches” them to existing entries. We’re here to explain and help you navigate this. Tired of reviewing downloaded transactions one by one in QuickBooks Online? Click on the Batch Actions button to explore this feature. We can show you how.

QuickBooks Online often guesses at how downloaded transactions should be categorized. You should always check these for accuracy, and we can show you how.

Working with Contractors in QuickBooks Online

It’s a gig economy. QuickBooks Online makes it easy to track and pay independent contractors.

In days past we used to call it “moonlighting” – taking on a second, part-time job for extra money. And we saw how prevalent this became was when millions of people had to resort to side gigs to keep afloat during the economic downturn of a decade ago. Some who had lost full-time employment even turned one or more of these part-time passions into a small business and became independent contractors for other companies.

If you’re thinking of hiring a freelancer to do some of your work, you’ll find that QuickBooks Online can accommodate your accounting needs for them nicely. Since they’re not W-2 workers, your paperwork needs are minimal. They’ll simply fill out an IRS Form W-9 and you’ll pay them for services provided, dispatching 1099-MISCs after the first of each year so they can pay their taxes.

Here’s how it works.

Creating Contractor Records

Warning: Be sure that any independent contractor you hire cannot be considered an actual employee. The IRS spells out the differences very clearly and takes this distinction very seriously. If you have any doubts, we can help you determine your new worker’s status.


You can either let a new contractor complete his or her own profile or do so yourself.

Like you would with anyone you employ, you’ll need to create records for contractors in QuickBooks Online. Click on Workers in the left navigation pane, then Contractors | Add a contractor. In the window that opens, enter the individual’s name and email address. If you want the contractor to complete his or her own profile, click on the box in front of Email this contractor…

Your contractor will receive an email with an invitation to create an Intuit account and enter W-9 information, which will be transmitted to your QuickBooks Online company account. This will make it easy to process 1099s when tax season arrives. He or she will also be able to use QuickBooks Self-Employed, an Intuit website designed for freelancers. We can walk you through how this works.

If you’d rather enter the worker’s contact details yourself, leave the box blank. A vertical panel containing fields for this information will slide out from the right.

Contractors are also considered vendors. So when you create a record for a contractor, it will also appear in your Vendors list in QuickBooks Online. In fact, you can complete a contractor profile by clicking Expenses in the left vertical pane, then Vendors. Click New Vendor in the upper right and fill in the relevant fields there. Be sure to check the box in front of Track payments for 1099. An abbreviated version of your new record will also be available on the Contractors screen as the two are synchronized.


When you create a Vendor record for an independent contractor, be sure to check the Track payments for 1099 box.

Working with Contractors

You’ll notice in the screenshot above that Brenda Cooper had an Opening balance of $2,450 when you created her record. That’s money you already owed her, and for which she had probably sent you an invoice. QuickBooks Online turned that into an Accounts Payable item that you could find in multiple reports and on both the Vendors and Expenses screens. It will be listed as a Bill in reports, though you haven’t actually created one yet.

You have three options here. You can create a Bill and fill in any missing details if you don’t plan to pay Brenda immediately. If you want to send her the money right away, you can either enter an Expense or write a Check. There are many places in QuickBooks Online where you can do the latter two. We think it’s easiest to return to the Contractors screen since you can accomplish all three from there.


The Contractors screen contains links to the three ways you can handle compensation due to a contractor.

Whenever you receive an invoice from a contractor, you can visit this same screen and choose one of the three options.

You’ll have to select a Category for your payment from the list provided in each of these three types of transactions. The Chart of Accounts contains one called Subcontractors, which may or may not work for your purposes.

We strongly encourage you to consult with us as you begin the process of managing independent contractor compensation to deal with this issue as well as others. QuickBooks Online offers multiple ways to get to the same end result, and it can be confusing. Contact us, and we can schedule a consultation.

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Hiring independent contractors? Be sure they should be classified as such, and not employees. We can help you determine how to do this.

QuickBooks Online offers many ways to do the same tasks when you’re working with independent contractors. Here is how we can help you figure this out.

There are three ways to record financial obligations to independent contractors: bill, check, and expense. Do you know the differences? We can help you figure this out.

Though you don’t have the same payroll requirements for contractors as you do employees, it’s very important to get it right. Here are a few ways we can help you with this.

Keeping Up With Your IRA: Tax Season Checklist

If you’re one of the millions of American households who own either a traditional individual retirement account (IRA) or a Roth IRA, then the onset of tax season should serve as a reminder to review your retirement savings strategies and make any changes that will enhance your prospects for long-term financial security. It’s also a good time to start an IRA if you don’t already have one. The IRS allows you to contribute to an IRA up to April 15, 2019, for the 2018 tax year.

This checklist will provide you with information to help you make informed decisions and implement a long-term retirement income strategy.

Which Account: Roth IRA or Traditional IRA?

There are two types of IRAs available: the traditional IRA and the Roth IRA. The primary difference between them is the tax treatment of contributions and distributions (withdrawals). Traditional IRAs may allow a tax deduction based on the amount of a contribution, depending on your income level. Any account earnings compound on a tax-deferred basis and distributions are taxable at the time of withdrawal at then-current income tax rates. Roth IRAs do not allow a deduction for contributions, but account earnings and qualified withdrawals are tax-free .1

In choosing between a traditional and a Roth IRA, you should weigh the immediate tax benefits of a tax deduction this year against the benefits of tax-deferred or tax-free distributions in retirement.

If you need the immediate deduction this year — and if you qualify for it — then you may wish to opt for a traditional IRA. If you don’t qualify for the deduction, then it’s almost certainly a better idea to fund a Roth IRA.

Case in point: Your ability to deduct traditional IRA contributions may be limited not only by income but by your participation in an employer-sponsored retirement plan. (See callout box below.) If that’s the case, a Roth IRA is likely to be the better solution.

On the other hand, if you expect your tax bracket to drop significantly after retirement, you may be better off with a traditional IRA if you qualify for the deduction. You could claim an immediate deduction now and pay taxes at the lower rate later. Nonetheless, if your anticipated holding period is long, a Roth IRA might still make more sense. That’s because a prolonged period of tax-free compounded earnings could more than makeup for the lack of a deduction.

Traditional IRA Deductible Contribution Phase-Outs
Your ability to deduct contributions to a traditional IRA is affected by whether you are covered by a workplace retirement plan.

If you are covered by a retirement plan at work, your deduction for contributions to a traditional IRA will be reduced (phased out) if your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is:

  • Between $101,000 and $121,000 for a married couple filing a joint return for the 2018 tax year.
  • Between $63,000 and $73,000 for a single individual or head of the household for the 2018 tax year.

If you are not covered by a retirement plan at work but your spouse is covered, your 2017 deduction for contributions to a traditional IRA will be reduced if your MAGI is between $189,000 and $199,000.

If your MAGI is higher than the phase-out ceilings listed above for your filing status, you cannot claim the deduction.

Roth IRA Contribution Phase-Outs
Your ability to contribute to a Roth IRA is affected by your MAGI. Contributions to a Roth IRA will be phased out if your MAGI is:

  • Between $189,000 and $199,000 for a married couple filing a joint return for the 2018 tax year.
  • Between $120,000 and $135,000 for a single individual or head of the household for the 2018 tax year.

If your MAGI is higher than the phase-out ceilings listed above for your filing status, you cannot make a contribution.

Should You Convert to Roth?

The IRS allows you to convert — or change the designation of — a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA, regardless of your income level. As part of the conversion, you must pay taxes on any investment growth in — and on the amount of any deductible contributions previously made to — the traditional IRA. The withdrawal from your traditional IRA will not affect your eligibility for a Roth IRA or trigger the 10% additional federal tax normally imposed on early withdrawals.

The decision to convert or not ultimately depends on your timing and tax status. If you are near retirement and find yourself in the top income tax bracket this year, now may not be the time to convert. On the other hand, if your income is unusually low and you still have many years to retirement, you may want to convert.

Maximize Contributions

If possible, try to contribute the maximum amount allowed by the IRS: $5,500 per individual, plus an additional $1,000 annually for those age 50 and older for the 2018 tax year. Those limits are per individual, not per IRA.

Of course, not everyone can afford to contribute the maximum to an IRA, especially if they’re also contributing to an employer-sponsored retirement plan. If your workplace retirement plan offers an employer’s matching contribution, that additional money may be more valuable than the amount of your deduction. As a result, it might make sense to maximize plan contributions first and then try to maximize IRA contributions.

Review Distribution Strategies

If you’re ready to start making withdrawals from an IRA, you’ll need to choose the distribution strategy to use: a lump-sum distribution or periodic distributions. If you are at least age 70½ and own a traditional IRA, you may need to take required minimum distributions every year, according to IRS rules.

Don’t forget that your distribution strategy may have significant tax-time implications if you own a traditional IRA because taxes will be due at the time of withdrawal. As a result, taking a lump-sum distribution will result in a much heftier tax bill this year than taking a minimum distribution.

The April filing deadline is never that far away, so don’t hesitate to use the remaining time to shore up the IRA strategies you’ll rely on to live comfortably in retirement.

Source/Disclaimer:

1Early withdrawals (before age 59½) from a traditional IRA may be subject to a 10% additional federal tax. Nonqualified withdrawals from a Roth IRA may be subject to ordinary income tax as well as the 10% additional tax.

…from the Team of Professional at RE-MMAP We are just a click or call away. www.re-mmap.com and phone # (561-623-0241).v

Beware of the Tax Liability that Comes with Being on a Non-Profit Board

If you are a volunteer board member for a nonprofit organization, one specific issue to keep in mind is the IRS’s trust fund recovery penalty. If any entity — nonprofit or for-profit — fails to properly remit Social Security taxes and/or income taxes withheld from employees’ wages, the IRS will directly approach the organization’s “responsible persons” for the tax payments and a potential 100% penalty… Learn about nonprofit bookkeeping at this Dave Burton article.

In general, the penalty will not be imposed on any unpaid, volunteer member of the board of a tax-exempt organization if the member: (1) is solely serving in an honorary capacity, (2) does not participate in the day-to-day operations of the organization, (3) does not participate in the financial operations of the organization, and (4) does not have actual knowledge of the failure on which the penalty is based.

However, for an active member who has governing responsibilities, it is still important to ask questions about who is handling these tax payments (a staff member, the executive director, a payroll service, an accountant?) and what checks and balances are in effect to make sure no problems arise. Annual reviews or audits may also be helpful to verify compliance.

To learn more about non-profit compliance issues, give us a call today. We look forward to helping your non-profit grow.

 

…from the Team of Professional at RE-MMAP We are just a click or call away. www.re-mmap.com and phone # (561-623-0241).v

Finding the right route: special topics for LGBT couples

Tax-Saving Tips for LGBT Couples

The issues around marriage equality caused lots of debate, but it was federal tax laws that finally prompted the Supreme Court to take a look. Prior to the 2013 United States v. Windsor decision, same-sex couples who were legally married in states or countries that recognized their union were unable to take advantage of certain federal benefits. For example, individuals in same-sex marriages were ineligible for the insurance benefits of their spouses who worked in government, and they could not receive social security survivor’s benefits or file joint tax returns.

The 2013 United States v. Windsor decision and the 2015 Obergefell v. Hodges decisions changed these practices, and LGBT couples became eligible for federal tax savings that were previously unavailable. The Amazon Best Selling book, The Great Tax Escape, offers a comprehensive look at making the most of these programs to enjoy greater tax savings.

Choosing Your Filing Status

The first tax-related issue to consider after you are married is how you will file your returns. Depending on your income, “married filing separately” could offer larger savings than “married filing jointly”. There is a phenomenon knows as “the marriage penalty”. This references the tax increase that many couples face when filing joint returns versus single returns.

Tax specialists can assist with significantly reducing tax liability through a combination of smart financial planning, examination of the impact of each filing status, and a review of all possible deductions. Filing status is expected to be particularly relevant for the 2018 tax year, as new tax regulations with revised tax brackets may reduce or eliminate the marriage penalty.

Quick Tips to Avoid Tax Filing Pitfalls

Completing your tax returns after you are married is not necessarily more complicated than filing as single, but there are a few differences to keep in mind. Small errors can lead to major frustration if your returns are rejected or you have to file an amended form. These are the most common pitfalls – and how to avoid them:

  • You must either choose “married filing jointly” or “married filing separately”. Other filing statuses are not permitted, including “head of household”. (Note: There is an exception available for married couples who have lived apart for six months or more.)
  • Your spouse cannot be listed as your dependent.
  • If you choose “married filing separately”, only one spouse can claim each dependent child.
  • Married couples must choose the same option with regard to itemizing deductions versus claiming the standard deduction.

Your Certified Tax Coach can provide the guidance you need to complete your returns correctly.

New Options for Reducing Estate Taxes

The underlying issue that prompted United States v. Windsor was the application of federal estate tax regulations. In short, married couples pay far less when a spouse dies than they would if no marriage existed. The individual who brought the suit wanted the same benefits as married couples who are opposite-sex. Today, all married couples can enjoy the tax savings that come with careful estate planning. Your Certified Tax Coach is an excellent resource for putting a tax minimization strategy in place to protect your wealth after one partner passes away.

For more tips on how LGBT couples can increase tax savings, visit our consultation form for your copy of our new release, The Great Tax Escape.

Expertly navigate the labyrinth of the tax code 23 tax saving tips for doctors

Quick Tips for Tax Savings: Physician Edition

Doctors offer critical services to the community through prevention and treatment of health issues that can lead to patients needing Home Care Assistance. However, getting the necessary education and experience can be challenging – both physically and financially. In an effort to make life a bit easier for physicians, lawmakers have put together a variety of programs to reduce tax liability for doctors. Maximizing these opportunities in combination with other tax-reduction strategies can dramatically increase the rewards of working as a healthcare provider. The Amazon Best Selling book, The Great Tax Escape, includes in-depth information on taking advantage of these tax savings techniques. Learn how to get a free copy of The Great Tax Escape here.

Small Changes Add Up to Big Savings

It may not be possible to implement all available tax savings strategies at once, but making small changes in managing your practice quickly adds up. Over time, continue to add layers of savings by implementing additional strategies. Before long, you will see your tax bill go down, even when your income is going up. These are just a few of the tips you will learn more about in The Great Tax Escape.

The Case for Specialized Financial Professionals

Free and low-cost budgeting and financial planning tools are great for those with basic financial situations. However, your position as a practicing physician is too complex for these platforms. Enlist a team of professionals with specific experience in tax issues that affect health care providers. Not only will they help you save your money more effectively – they will also assist you in planning major purchases to minimize tax expenses. Long-term, you are likely to realize a significant return on this investment.

Common Deductions You Probably Aren’t Maximizing

Though you are already aware of many deductions available to you, it is likely that you are not yet getting the maximum tax savings you are entitled to. For example, continuing education expenses, depreciation of your medical equipment, and student loan interest are frequently underreported on physicians’ tax returns. Your Certified Tax Coach can guide you through the nuances of these deductions, as well as the specific opportunities available to medical professionals.

The Benefits of Better Record-Keeping

Whether you work for yourself or you are employed by a larger healthcare organization, you are always moving at a rapid pace. For many physicians, that means letting the little things slide. While you always meticulously update your patients’ records, you are probably less careful about recording your expenses. Over the course of a year, these small charges add up, and you could be missing out on significant tax savings for want of a few receipts. Make financial record-keeping a priority, and you will notice a difference in your year-end tax bill.

Be Ready for Retirement

Paying off your student loans often takes precedence over saving for retirement – especially when you are just starting out in your career. However, contributing to your retirement accounts now has across-the-board benefits for your current and future financial state. The funds you deposit are given special tax-advantaged status, and when you contribute regularly over a long period of time, you are better able to ride out the ups and downs of the market.

For more information on tax-saving opportunities specifically impacting physicians, visit our consultation form for your copy of The Great Tax Escape.

…from the Team of Professional at RE-MMAP We are just a click or call away. www.re-mmap.com and phone # (561-623-0241).v

Famed Hedge Fund Manager Makes History with Billion Dollar Bet

It was one of the greatest financial bets of all time. Hedge fund manager John Paulson bet big against subprime mortgages ahead of last decade’s financial crisis, earning billions in profits for his funds. It was a gamble that, in the long run, didn’t pay off.

Along with the $4 billion he earned for himself, he nailed a second record-breaking honor when he was slapped with one of the largest personal tax bills in history.

According to people close to the firm, Paulson used a tax provision available at the time to hedge fund managers. After deferring the bulk of taxes on the profits, Paulson’s personal tax bill came due on April 17th when he was required to pay about a billion dollars. This is on top of $500,000 he paid late the year before.

Only one problem.

The sum of his payment surpasses the maximum amount allowable by the IRS for payment by a single taxpayer with a single check. That amount is $99,999,999.

Like many investment managers, Hedge fund managers profit from fees amounting to a percentage of gains generated for their clients. In the case of Paulson & Co. that percentage is 20%.

For years—decades actually—tax authorities allowed hedge funds to defer receipt of this type of income. The reason the IRS permits this deferment of compensation by executives is that it tends to lower the company’s compensation costs, forcing them to pay higher taxes on profits. This offsets income taxes not paid right away by the employees.

Sounds like a win-win situation, right?

Well, maybe not this time.

In the case of offshore hedge funds that don’t pay offsetting U.S. taxes, such as some of those operated by Paulson, the treasury was not on the winning team.

A tax change mandated by Congress in 2008 gave hedge fund managers like Paulson until April 17, 2018 to pay taxes on money accumulated before the law changed. People close to the firm say Paulson turned to his Credit Opportunities fund, which is one of several he operates.

Word has it this fund held about $3.5 billion in assets late last year. The bulk was represented by Paulson’s own interests. He made an initial tax payment late last year by pulling funds from this account. He pulled another $1 billion from the fund and used it for the money due on April 17th.

Guess who was said to be the largest investor in the fund?

Right.

The government wants its money, but paying Paulson’s bill might not be easy. He could wire it if he wanted but might prefer paying by check if he’ll earn interest on the money until authorities cash the check. If so, he might have to submit multiple payments because the IRS will only accept a payment of less than $100 million.

He could do that if he can get past the most common problem: fitting such huge numbers onto the appropriate line on a check.

We should all have such problems….

…from the Team of Professional at RE-MMAP We are just a click or call away. www.re-mmap.com and phone # (561-623-0241).v

California Courts Put the Squeeze on Statewide Hiring Practices

In an effort to even the playing field, a unanimous decision by the California Supreme Court recently put business owners across the state in somewhat of a chokehold. With a ruling that could change the workplace status of people across the state, they’ve made it harder to classify workers as independent contractors.

Class-Action Lawsuit

The ruling came as a result of a class-action lawsuit against Dynamex Operations West, Inc. The suit charged that Dynamex, a package, and document delivery company, misclassified its delivery drivers, calling them independent contractors when they were actually employees.

If they did misclassify, they are not the only company doing the same thing. The ruling has implications for the expanding gig economy, an environment in which organizations contract with independent workers for short-term engagements.

Companies such as Uber and Lyft are also being targeted but it could extend to other business models. Hiring independent contractors versus employees is a swiftly growing trend.

The trend is popular in part because it makes good financial sense for businesses. With employment overhead rising over the last couple of decades, employers are backing away from the would-be money-suck and instead of hiring independent contractors for the jobs once held by full-time and part-time employees.

In recent years, the trend toward hiring independent contractors instead of employees has gone through the roof. A 2016 study by economists at Harvard and Princeton universities estimated 8.4% of the U.S. workforce is classified as independent contractors.

That’s 12.5 million people.

It’s a no-brainer really. Companies that hire independent contractors are not bound by the rules governing employment.

The Advantages?

No workers comp.

No deductions.

No piles of paperwork.

No minimum wage or overtime pay.

A 1099 at the end of the year does it, and they’re good to go. Contractors are in charge of managing their own responsibilities to the IRS and state governments.

End of story.

But the story doesn’t always have a happy ending.

If workers are misclassified, the business doing the hiring faces stiff fines. Employment lawyers say many are questioning whether it would be best to reclassify before someone waves a red flag in their direction.

What is an Independent Contractor?

According to the court ruling, independent contractors:

  • Perform work outside of the hirer’s core business
  • Engage in an independently established trade, occupation or business.
  • Would not reasonably be viewed as working for the hiring business.

The court says businesses that hire workers must show that the workers are working in their own established businesses, free from the control and direction of the employer. That means no established hours or expectations as would be expected of an employee.

The aforementioned ruling did not resolve the Dynamex case, but it did help define independent contractors for lower courts grappling with the dispute. The court said wage and hour laws were adopted to enable people to earn a subsistence standard of living and to protect workers’ health and safety. The laws also shield the public from having to assume financial responsibility for workers earning substandard wages or working in unhealthy or unsafe conditions, the court noted.

“This is an effort to level the unequal playing field — misclassified workers have been taken advantage of for decades,” said Gutman Dickinson, a partner at Bush Gottlieb.

The risk of misclassifying workers—intentionally or otherwise—is substantial. A worker may be denied the status of employee “only if the worker is the type of traditional independent contractor — such as an independent plumber or electrician — who would not reasonably be viewed as working in the hiring business,” the court said.

Examples of Independent Contractors:

    • Plumber
    • Electrician
    • Hairdresser
    • Copywriter
    • Computer Tech

As long as the worker is temporarily hired he or she would be classified as an independent contractor. But a cake decorator who works on a regular basis custom-designing cake—even from home—would be an employee.

This discussion is significant on many levels, not the least of which concerns the California Labor Commission. According to their website, the misclassification of workers as independent contractors costs the state roughly $7 billion in lost payroll taxes each year.

To follow these changes and others, connect with one of our tax experts.

…from the Team of Professional at RE-MMAP We are just a click or call away. www.re-mmap.com and phone # (561-623-0241).v