Finding the right route: special topics for LGBT couples

Tax-Saving Tips for LGBT Couples

The issues around marriage equality caused lots of debate, but it was federal tax laws that finally prompted the Supreme Court to take a look. Prior to the 2013 United States v. Windsor decision, same-sex couples who were legally married in states or countries that recognized their union were unable to take advantage of certain federal benefits. For example, individuals in same-sex marriages were ineligible for the insurance benefits of their spouses who worked in government, and they could not receive social security survivor’s benefits or file joint tax returns.

The 2013 United States v. Windsor decision and the 2015 Obergefell v. Hodges decisions changed these practices, and LGBT couples became eligible for federal tax savings that were previously unavailable. The Amazon Best Selling book, The Great Tax Escape, offers a comprehensive look at making the most of these programs to enjoy greater tax savings.

Choosing Your Filing Status

The first tax-related issue to consider after you are married is how you will file your returns. Depending on your income, “married filing separately” could offer larger savings than “married filing jointly”. There is a phenomenon knows as “the marriage penalty”. This references the tax increase that many couples face when filing joint returns versus single returns.

Tax specialists can assist with significantly reducing tax liability through a combination of smart financial planning, examination of the impact of each filing status, and a review of all possible deductions. Filing status is expected to be particularly relevant for the 2018 tax year, as new tax regulations with revised tax brackets may reduce or eliminate the marriage penalty.

Quick Tips to Avoid Tax Filing Pitfalls

Completing your tax returns after you are married is not necessarily more complicated than filing as single, but there are a few differences to keep in mind. Small errors can lead to major frustration if your returns are rejected or you have to file an amended form. These are the most common pitfalls – and how to avoid them:

  • You must either choose “married filing jointly” or “married filing separately”. Other filing statuses are not permitted, including “head of household”. (Note: There is an exception available for married couples who have lived apart for six months or more.)
  • Your spouse cannot be listed as your dependent.
  • If you choose “married filing separately”, only one spouse can claim each dependent child.
  • Married couples must choose the same option with regard to itemizing deductions versus claiming the standard deduction.

Your Certified Tax Coach can provide the guidance you need to complete your returns correctly.

New Options for Reducing Estate Taxes

The underlying issue that prompted United States v. Windsor was the application of federal estate tax regulations. In short, married couples pay far less when a spouse dies than they would if no marriage existed. The individual who brought the suit wanted the same benefits as married couples who are opposite-sex. Today, all married couples can enjoy the tax savings that come with careful estate planning thanks to a estate planning attorney. Your Certified Tax Coach is an excellent resource for putting a tax minimization strategy in place to protect your wealth after one partner passes away.

For more tips on how LGBT couples can increase tax savings, visit our consultation form for your copy of our new release, The Great Tax Escape.

Expertly navigate the labyrinth of the tax code 23 tax saving tips for doctors

Quick Tips for Tax Savings: Physician Edition

Doctors offer critical services to the community through prevention and treatment of health issues that can lead to patients needing Home Care Assistance. However, getting the necessary education and experience can be challenging – both physically and financially. In an effort to make life a bit easier for physicians, lawmakers have put together a variety of programs to reduce tax liability for doctors. Maximizing these opportunities in combination with other tax-reduction strategies can dramatically increase the rewards of working as a healthcare provider. The Amazon Best Selling book, The Great Tax Escape, includes in-depth information on taking advantage of these tax savings techniques. Learn how to get a free copy of The Great Tax Escape here.

Small Changes Add Up to Big Savings

It may not be possible to implement all available tax savings strategies at once, but making small changes in managing your practice quickly adds up. Over time, continue to add layers of savings by implementing additional strategies. Before long, you will see your tax bill go down, even when your income is going up. These are just a few of the tips you will learn more about in The Great Tax Escape.

The Case for Specialized Financial Professionals

Free and low-cost budgeting and financial planning tools are great for those with basic financial situations. However, your position as a practicing physician is too complex for these platforms. Enlist a team of professionals with specific experience in tax issues that affect health care providers. Not only will they help you save your money more effectively – they will also assist you in planning major purchases to minimize tax expenses. Long-term, you are likely to realize a significant return on this investment.

Common Deductions You Probably Aren’t Maximizing

Though you are already aware of many deductions available to you, it is likely that you are not yet getting the maximum tax savings you are entitled to. For example, continuing education expenses, depreciation of your medical equipment, and student loan interest are frequently underreported on physicians’ tax returns. Your Certified Tax Coach can guide you through the nuances of these deductions, as well as the specific opportunities available to medical professionals.

The Benefits of Better Record-Keeping

Whether you work for yourself or you are employed by a larger healthcare organization, you are always moving at a rapid pace. For many physicians, that means letting the little things slide. While you always meticulously update your patients’ records, you are probably less careful about recording your expenses. Over the course of a year, these small charges add up, and you could be missing out on significant tax savings for want of a few receipts. Make financial record-keeping a priority, and you will notice a difference in your year-end tax bill.

Be Ready for Retirement

Paying off your student loans often takes precedence over saving for retirement – especially when you are just starting out in your career. However, contributing to your retirement accounts now has across-the-board benefits for your current and future financial state. The funds you deposit are given special tax-advantaged status, and when you contribute regularly over a long period of time, you are better able to ride out the ups and downs of the market.

For more information on tax-saving opportunities specifically impacting physicians, visit our consultation form for your copy of The Great Tax Escape.

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Seriously? Sweat Equity is Not Deductible?

The labors of love you pour into your business may have a fair market value on the street, but how do you accurately translate your net worth?

Is it $100 an hour or does it range in the thousands? For the CEOs of some publically traded companies that number is often tens of thousands an hour.

But you won’t be able to calculate the value of your efforts until you have been paid.

What About Charity Donation?

Okay, we know, you’re worth every penny, but when you donate time to charity or you’re looking to deduct the cost of your time spent, it can cause confusion at tax time. For entrepreneurs who assume their sweat equity is deductible, this can result in shock and disappointment.

The Startup Phase

Starting a new business is an exciting time for an entrepreneur. Ideas are taking shape and heart-held dreams are becoming tangible realities. But unless they’re backed by a substantial nest egg or loan, most businesses need time to produce enough cash flow to compensate the owner for development time.

Many business owners spend hours establishing their businesses before they even open the front door (virtual or otherwise). Ensuring their company’s viability doesn’t often happen overnight. Market testing and calculating pricing take time.

What’s the legal answer to this question?

Well, perhaps it can be found in a recently decided court case. The issue? Whether or not a taxpayer can deduct the value of sweat equity, i.e. services for which he/she is unpaid.

In short, a sole proprietorship reported a loss in his business providing services at no charge. The amount was substantial: $29,500. The taxpayer used this loss as a deduction against his income of $234,000 earned that year (2014). While he had not spent any actual money out of pocket, he argued that research was needed to succeed in his business; yes, sweat equity.

The court ruled against the taxpayer in this case because, in order to take a deduction, one must pay or otherwise incur an expense to be eligible to deduct it. The labor itself is not within the meaning of Code Section 162.

Donating Time to Charity

What about taxpayers or business owners who donate their time to a charitable cause? We’ve already determined their time has value. Certainly, the court must allow for this type of deduction, right?

Well, no, not this one. Donations of services are not deductible charitable contributions. However, if business owners or taxpayers donate the value of their work in cash so the organization can hire someone else to do the work, it then becomes a tax-deductible donation.

Donated labor is not deductible even to nonprofits because, in the normal earning cycle of a business, the net value of the services donated is zero.

For example, consider service on a nonprofit board. If you charge for the work, you would earn according to your pay scale. However, in donating your services you are not paid.

Now, there’s a way around it.

If the organization pays you for your service and you then donate it, you would be reporting it as income. You would owe and pay taxes on the money earned and then be able to deduct your cash donation. By not receiving the income, you avoid reporting the fees in additional revenue for the year, and you’ll also forego the charitable deduction. Either way, the result is the same.

While your personal valuation of sweat equity you put into your business may result in Fortune 500 positioning, it won’t help you reduce your tax bill.

More questions, feel free to give us a call. As a Certified Tax Coach, we can assist you.

 

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Deducting Business Expenses: Your Motor-home or Recreational Vehicle

Here’s an idea: Why not purchase a motorhome or recreational vehicle and deduct it as a business expense?

As long as you use it for business this could be a really sweet deal. And if you just happen to use it for pleasure once or twice, that’s no big deal, right?

You won’t be the first person to think of this and if you don’t follow the IRS rules, you won’t be the last to experience the consequences. The courts and the IRS have battled this discussion out several times. Both have been challenged trying to confirm when the motor home is a business vehicle and when it is a business lodging facility.

Does it matter?

It does. The business aspects of owning a motorhome will qualify for tax deductions, but this comes with a set of rules.

Bear this in mind: if you travel for business and plan to deduct your motorhome as a lodging facility, be sure to count the number of nights you use it for business purposes and use that to measure the number of permissible deductions.

On the other hand, if you use your motor home or RV as a second home, you would deduct the business percentage of its use for business travel without having to consider Section 280A impediments.

It can be complicated, so be sure you understand the guidelines.

Before you can deduct the business expenses associated with your motorhome you need to determine what it actually costs to operate the business-related usage. Along with depreciation and interest or lease payments, be sure to add insurance to the equation.

Take into consideration all of the expenses associated with maintaining your RV. Here are a few other expenses to include in your calculation:

  • Motor oil
  • Gas
  • Car Washes
  • Tires
  • Licensing Fees
  • Property Tax
  • Parking
  • Tolls

Of course, you’ll only be limited to deducting your business-related expenses. Will painting or wrapping your recreational vehicle with advertisements qualify when deducting personal miles?

You know the answer….

It will not.

Maintain Good Records

The best way to ensure you maximize your allowable deductions on your motorhome or RV is to keep impeccable records. Keep a mileage log and record every single trip—business and pleasure. Make sure you have accrued more than 50 percent business nights.

Even if you think you have a great memory, don’t store this information in your head. Record every single night you use your motorhome for business or personal lodging.

Last but certainly not least, keep IRS Section 280(f)(4) top of mind. This section says the use of your motorhome for overnight business lodging produces deductions for business travel and that business travel is not subject to the vacation home rules.

For a clear explanation of tax deductions for motorhomes or RVs, contact one of our tax professionals. Better to plan ahead than to clean up a mess after the fact.

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California Courts Put the Squeeze on Statewide Hiring Practices

In an effort to even the playing field, a unanimous decision by the California Supreme Court recently put business owners across the state in somewhat of a chokehold. With a ruling that could change the workplace status of people across the state, they’ve made it harder to classify workers as independent contractors.

Class-Action Lawsuit

The ruling came as a result of a class-action lawsuit against Dynamex Operations West, Inc. The suit charged that Dynamex, a package, and document delivery company, misclassified its delivery drivers, calling them independent contractors when they were actually employees.

If they did misclassify, they are not the only company doing the same thing. The ruling has implications for the expanding gig economy, an environment in which organizations contract with independent workers for short-term engagements.

Companies such as Uber and Lyft are also being targeted but it could extend to other business models. Hiring independent contractors versus employees is a swiftly growing trend.

The trend is popular in part because it makes good financial sense for businesses. With employment overhead rising over the last couple of decades, employers are backing away from the would-be money-suck and instead of hiring independent contractors for the jobs once held by full-time and part-time employees.

In recent years, the trend toward hiring independent contractors instead of employees has gone through the roof. A 2016 study by economists at Harvard and Princeton universities estimated 8.4% of the U.S. workforce is classified as independent contractors.

That’s 12.5 million people.

It’s a no-brainer really. Companies that hire independent contractors are not bound by the rules governing employment.

The Advantages?

No workers comp.

No deductions.

No piles of paperwork.

No minimum wage or overtime pay.

A 1099 at the end of the year does it, and they’re good to go. Contractors are in charge of managing their own responsibilities to the IRS and state governments.

End of story.

But the story doesn’t always have a happy ending.

If workers are misclassified, the business doing the hiring faces stiff fines. Employment lawyers at this page say many are questioning whether it would be best to reclassify before someone waves a red flag in their direction.

What is an Independent Contractor?

According to the court ruling, independent contractors:

  • Perform work outside of the hirer’s core business
  • Engage in an independently established trade, occupation or business.
  • Would not reasonably be viewed as working for the hiring business.

The court says businesses that hire workers must show that the workers are working in their own established businesses, free from the control and direction of the employer. That means no established hours or expectations as would be expected of an employee.

The aforementioned ruling did not resolve the Dynamex case, but it did help define independent contractors for lower courts grappling with the dispute. The court said wage and hour laws were adopted to enable people to earn a subsistence standard of living and to protect workers’ health and safety. The laws also shield the public from having to assume financial responsibility for workers earning substandard wages or working in unhealthy or unsafe conditions, the court noted.

“This is an effort to level the unequal playing field — misclassified workers have been taken advantage of for decades,” said Gutman Dickinson, a partner at Bush Gottlieb.

The risk of misclassifying workers—intentionally or otherwise—is substantial. A worker may be denied the status of employee “only if the worker is the type of traditional independent contractor — such as an independent plumber or electrician — who would not reasonably be viewed as working in the hiring business,” the court said.

Examples of Independent Contractors:

    • Plumber
    • Electrician
    • Hairdresser
    • Copywriter
    • Computer Tech

As long as the worker is temporarily hired he or she would be classified as an independent contractor. But a cake decorator who works on a regular basis custom-designing cake—even from home—would be an employee.

This discussion is significant on many levels, not the least of which concerns the California Labor Commission. According to their website, the misclassification of workers as independent contractors costs the state roughly $7 billion in lost payroll taxes each year.

To follow these changes and others, connect with one of our tax experts.

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Are Entertainment Deductions History?

It’s no secret that many a sale has been closed over a three-martini lunch. Client entertainment is a given in most industries and most salespeople carry a company credit card for just such transactions.

It’s also no secret that more than a little commingling goes on between personal entertainment expenditures and those that qualify as business expenditures. That is no longer an issue; at least for now. Here’s why….

Under the new tax reform, the veil separating business expenses and pleasure has come crashing down with the elimination of entertainment deductions.

Not good news for business owners who counted on this deduction to defray tax bills at the end of the year. Even the limited deduction of 50% is no longer valid for dinners or cocktails with prospective clients or service providers and similar entertainment expenses.

What could be worse?

Well, how about this: sales related entertaining such as:

  • Sporting events—nixed,
  • Boating and Golfing—nixed.
  • Theater and other shows, box seats at stadiums—yes, those too.

What Does This Mean for Tax Planners?

Will they still be able to work their magic? Their expertise as tax planners is founded in creative workarounds and alternatives. The old saying, when one door closes, another opens applies in the tax world too.

What are The Options?

Well, there’s always Internal Revenue Code Section 274(e).

Despite reforming entertainment-related expenses, this will allow some expenses to be deducted, albeit under different circumstances.

For instance, if you pay for the use of club seating or a private box at a stadium, using this as compensation for your employees will still allow this expense to be deductible.

You need to meet two criteria to make this shift:

  • Ensure your employees attend these events.
  • Include the value of each event as taxable wages.

The “downside” for your team is an additional tax that will be subject to withholding and is includable on their form W-2.

The “upside” is it will ensure you can still deduct the expense.

Are Business Meetings Still Covered?

Brace yourself for the GOOD NEWS … YES!

As always, events and entertainment expenses related to business meetings including the board of directors and employee meetings continue to be deductible, . Deductible expenses continue to include meals and beverages, subject to the 50% limitation, facility rental, décor, supplies, and ancillary costs.

Is There Any Other Way to Deduct Entertainment Expenses?

Again, yes. You can still provide entertainment to the public, your clients, or prospective customers by issuing an information tax statement to the recipient. The most common form to use would be the form 1099-Misc. The recipient will need to include it as income and it will be taxable, but your business will still benefit from the deduction.

Let’s get more creative.

You might consider charging for the event or experience, being able to use different services online like an event company in London that specializes in producing events in this city. Sure the income will be taxable, but the cost of the activity will become deductible, transforming your expense from after-tax to pre-tax dollars.

The new tax reform brings big changes but your tax planner will still be able to work with you and provide valuable advice. To find out more about how to navigate the tax laws both new and old, be sure to work with someone who is certified in tax planning. We’ll help you find the new ways to open doors to a lower tax bill!

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Starting a Business Are Startup Costs Deductible?

There can be no more exciting a time than to go from punching a clock to being your own boss. But starting a business means more than deductible lunch dates and setting your own hours. If you think self-employment means you get to kick back and relax, it won’t happen. Most entrepreneurs will tell you they have never worked harder.

Starting a new business takes time and money. If you do nothing else, begin with a business plan. Your investment of blood, sweat, and tears can pay off for the life of your business—as long as you make prudent choices, and a business plan will help you calculate what you’ll need and how much it will cost.

The money you invest is tax deductible, right?

Well … not always.

Don’t make the mistake of assuming all your startup costs are deductible. As long as your total startup costs are $50,000 or less, the IRS allows you to deduct a limited amount of startup costs, and also organizational costs.

On the other hand, if your startup costs for either area exceed $50,000, your allowable deductions are reduced by that dollar amount. Once you make your first sale, however, you can claim all of your business startup expenses. Read on for details.

What Are Startup Expenses?

These days no business can operate without using some form of technology. Unless you plan to use your 3-year-old laptop to run your online business, you’re going to need to purchase equipment to help facilitate your business. Oh, and you’ll need a smartphone if you want to keep up.

Of course, computers and office equipment would qualify as startup expenses. If you need to rent office space or even a cubicle in a cooperative setting, they would also qualify. However, shelf any plans to stand by the mailbox waiting for your hefty check from the IRS. Neither of these expenses can be deducted until after your first sale, at which time they will be deducted over a period of 15 years.

The Upside?

You can choose to deduct the first $5,000 in your first year of business for startup costs, and another $5,000 for organizational costs. Expenses such as legal fees, corporate filing, DBA, and related expenses fall under this designation, but only if your total startup costs are $50,000 or less. If your expenses were over $55,000 you lose the right to any deduction at all.

Make sure you save all receipts for purchases. The laws change so it’s in your best interest to be aware. Check with your tax professional, who will be aware of the latest IRS tax laws. He or she will advise as to whether your startup expenses qualify for a deduction.

 

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Home-Based Business Mixing Business with Pleasure At Tax Time

Want the attention of the IRS? All you have to do is make personal transactions on your business account. RED FLAG!

It’s called comingling funds, and it can get you into big trouble at tax time.

No, pleading ignorance will not save you.

What’s The Difference?

Expenses associated with personal products or services, living expenses or family expenses are not business expenses and generally non-deductable. Buying a new TV, even if you watch a program or two focused on your industry, is no more a business expense than taking Grandma to dinner.

However, if you have expenses that are partly personal and partly business, as long as you divide the total cost appropriately, the IRS permits deduction of the business portion. Doable, yes, but keep in mind this complicates things during tax season.

For example, let’s say you use your credit card to borrow money. You spend 90 percent of it buying a new office phone system and the other 10 percent for a cordless home phone. The 90 percent used for business is deductible. The remaining 10 percent is a personal expense must be divided out. It’s not deductible.

Home-Based Business Expenses

Here is another potentially sticky spot if you try to fudge.

Do you work from home? Many people do these days. It makes good sense, and not only for entrepreneurs. Many corporations allow employees to sign onto their computers and work from home. The company saves money and ultimately, employees can be more productive in a home setting.

It gets sticky when home-based business owners try to claim all of their home expenses and utilities and file for business deductions on the lump sum.

The IRS sees RED.

It’s best not to comingle funds, but if you find yourself needing to make separate calculations for personal and business expenses from the same account, accuracy is paramount, i.e. don’t make mistakes.

There are two options for home-based businesses at tax time. Which one is right for you?

Regular Method

When using the regular method to calculate expenses, home office deductions will be based on the percentage of your home devoted to business use. Whether you use a part of a room or the whole second floor of your home for conducting business, figure out the percentage of that space and related expenses to determine deductions.

Simplified Option

There’s also a simplified option that makes things easier for many small business owners who seek security to protect their asset, cctv installation Melbourne is the way to go. It was designed to cut out some of the burdens of tedious recordkeeping associated with the regular method.

In lieu of calculating and dividing expenses, the simplified method allows qualified taxpayers to multiply a prescribed rate by the allowable square footage of the business space.

Mixing Business with Pleasure

Be aware that mixing personal expenses in with business expenses by running them through your business will likely NOT go unnoticed. You won’t be the first to try and the IRS is paying attention.

Never use your business account for personal purposes, and if you do, don’t claim those expenses on your taxes. Home rent, pet care, and other personal expenses are blatantly disallowed.

What surprises many new business owners is that clothing (yes, even though you get dressed for meetings) and groceries are not deductible. Don’t even try.

Certain items, such as gifts and entertainment, may be allowable if they are business expenses. Hold onto receipts and keep good records. Always talk to your tax professional to be sure.

You can avoid a red flag by keeping business and personal accounts separate. Right. Two different accounts. This will minimize issues at tax time, and help you avoid an IRS audit.

 

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Putting a Value on Donated Property

Donating noncash property valued at more than $5,000 to a charitable organization generally requires a qualified appraisal that meets IRS guidelines.* Fair market value is the price that property would sell for on the open market. Its principles — willing buyer and willing seller, no compulsion to buy or sell, and reasonable knowledge of the relevant facts — remain mainstays of the valuation rules. However, the IRS cites other factors that may be considered in making the determination.

Cost or selling price. The price paid for an item can be an accurate measure of fair market value when the transaction and the donation dates are close and no change has occurred that would affect the item’s value.

Sales of comparable properties. Sales prices of comparable properties may be used to help determine value based on the degree of similarity of the property, the time between the sale and the donation, and the sale conditions.

Replacement cost. The cost of buying property similar to the donated item may be a consideration. An appropriate amount for depreciation must be deducted.

Opinions of experts. The expert should be knowledgeable and competent, and his or her opinion should be thorough and supported by facts.

Choosing a Qualified Appraiser

A qualified appraiser is someone who

  • Has earned an appraisal designation from a recognized organization or has met certain education and experience requirements.
  • Regularly prepares appraisals for a fee.
  • Is not an “excluded individual.” In general, this would include the donor; the donee; a person who sold, exchanged, or gave the property to the donor or acted as a transfer agent; or a person “related to” any of the above. (Other exclusions apply.)

A qualified appraisal must be signed and dated. The appraisal must be made no earlier than 60 days before the valued property is donated.

For more help with individual or business taxes, connect with us today. Our team can help you with all your tax issues, large and small.

 

* IRS Publication 561, Determining the Value of Donated Property

 

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Know what Documentation you Need for Your Charitable Donations

To claim a deduction for a charitable donation, you must have certain documentation. The current tax law requirements are summarized in the table below.

 

Additional Tips

 

Here are some other points to keep in mind.

 

Multiple contributions. If you make multiple contributions of less than $250 to the same charity during the year, you generally should treat each contribution separately in determining the amount of the contribution and the supporting records you should have.

 

Donations of clothing and household items. To be deductible, these donations must be in “good used” condition or better unless you are claiming a deduction of over $500 and include a qualified appraisal of the item with your return. If you can’t get a receipt from the charity because you left items at a charity’s unattended drop site, note the charity’s name, the contribution date, and a description of the items you donated and keep it on file. Also, note the donated items’ fair market values and how you determined the values.

 

Text message donations. If you donate money by sending a text message — to a disaster relief charity, for example — the donation will be routed through the cell phone company you use. The company forwards the amount you donate to the charity, and the charge appears on your bill. Therefore, the telephone bill showing the date and amount of your donation to the organization will serve as the proof you need to substantiate your contribution.

 

Contribution        Amount                 Records

Type                    Contributed          Required

 

Monetary              Less than $250      Bank record or written receipt:

(cash, credit                                        • Name of organization

card, check)                                       • Amount of contribution

  • Date of contribution

 

Monetary              $250 or more         Same as for monetary contribution of less than

(cash, credit                                        $250 plus written acknowledgment stating:

card, check)                                       • Contribution amount

  • Whether charity provided goods/services in exchange
  • Description, an estimated value of goods/services provided

 

Monetary              Any amount           Pay stub, Form W-2, or another document from the employer

(payroll                                              that shows amount withheld for payment to charity

deduction)                                          Pledge card showing charity’s name

Written acknowledgment if $250 or more is deducted

from single paycheck

 

Property               Less than $250      Receipt, letter, other written communication from

charity stating:

  • Name of organization
  • Date and location of contribution
  • Property description

(receipt not required when impractical to obtain)

Record of property’s fair market value on the contribution

date and how the value was determined

 

Property               $250-$500             Same as for property donation of less than $250 plus

written acknowledgment must state whether charity provided

goods or services in exchange and, if so, their value

 

Property               $500-$5,000          Written acknowledgment

Form 8283 (filed with tax return) stating:

  • How and when a property was acquired
  • Cost or another adjusted basis of property (unless publicly

traded securities)

 

Property               Over $5,000          Same records as for property donations of $500-$5,000 plus:

  • Qualified appraisal (exceptions apply)
  • Appraisal summary with Form 8283

 

To learn more about donations and taxes, give us a call today. Our staff of professionals is always happy to help.

 

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